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Fixing The Current NCAA Situation


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NIL (something that I was in-support-of for years) has now allowed larger programs the ability to ‘buy’ players from smaller schools.

If something isn’t changed, schools like SLU will be fielding new and/or subpar rosters, every year.

So, what’s the fix?

Should there be a ‘cap’ on what a player can make, from NIL, in a year?

Should the university be totally ‘hands off’ when it comes to securing deals (meaning, the player can seek out whatever he/she wants, but has to do their own legwork)?

Do we bring back the rule where you have to sit out for a year, if you use the transfer portal? Maybe make it so you cannot earn NIL money until they year is up?

I’m sure some court would shut these ideas down, if the NCAA tried to implement them, but something needs to happen. 

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The 1 time transfer rule was a hail mary attempt by the NCAA to stop NIL's.  A way of removing that rule would be to say it was a way to help the student athlete during covid.  Then again Charlie Moore played for a different school every year.  

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SLU will do whatever it will do to adapt to reality. Something is better than nothing in my opinion, but whatever SLU actually does is likely not going to satisfy the MBMs of the board. SLUs priorities are not those of this board.

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1 hour ago, thunderdan said:

NIL (something that I was in-support-of for years) has now allowed larger programs the ability to ‘buy’ players from smaller schools.

If something isn’t changed, schools like SLU will be fielding new and/or subpar rosters, every year.

So, what’s the fix?

Should there be a ‘cap’ on what a player can make, from NIL, in a year?

Should the university be totally ‘hands off’ when it comes to securing deals (meaning, the player can seek out whatever he/she wants, but has to do their own legwork)?

Do we bring back the rule where you have to sit out for a year, if you use the transfer portal? Maybe make it so you cannot earn NIL money until they year is up?

I’m sure some court would shut these ideas down, if the NCAA tried to implement them, but something needs to happen. 

what about an agreement of ncaa schools that the buying school has to match the salary of the incoming player in the form of a penalty to the school losing the player.  i.e. tennessee would have to pay slu $200,000.    if tennessee doesnt wish to pay, they dont give collins a roster spot.  

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20 minutes ago, billiken_roy said:

what about an agreement of ncaa schools that the buying school has to match the salary of the incoming player in the form of a penalty to the school losing the player.  i.e. tennessee would have to pay slu $200,000.    if tennessee doesnt wish to pay, they dont give collins a roster spot.  

Schools officially have nothing to do with NIL.  They can provide a portal for people to reach out to athletes and contract 3rd party to advise student-athletes but they officially have no part in the money transfer.   The courts ruled players can profit from their NIL that's not going away.  The NCAA will not be able to cap that amount. 

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Just now, TheA_Bomb said:

Schools officially have nothing to do with NIL.  They can provide a portal for people to reach out to athletes and contract 3rd party to advise student-athletes but they officially have no part in the money transfer.   The courts ruled players can profit from their NIL that's not going away.  The NCAA will not be able to cap that amount. 

first i dont think the courts intended the NIL to just be a money giveaway.   imo they wanted the players to have the right to set up companies or take jobs or contracts to make money off their likeness i.e. billboards, commercials, tshirt companies, etc.  

second, the ncaa can do whatever they want in regards to their tourney.   so if a program doesnt want to abide by the requirement to pay a penalty to the schools that lost said player in an amount equal to the pay that player receives, then either that school needs to refuse a roster spot to the player to remain eligible for the tourney or they would be out of the tourney.   

at least the program that has hours of time, sweat and money developing that player.   they deserve some kind of compensation imo.   it would allow that school to get some revenue to be able to compete for other players and replace the departing player. 

 

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NIL will transform the non-moneyed schools to modern-day junior colleges.

But, what happens when a football or basketball player who received NIL money, but the coach wants to cut him? Does he keep the money, and move on to another school? It happens in pro sports, where the player dogs it, until the next contract. The NIL fund might force the coach to keep the player, even he is non-performing. 

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The NIL group has become a front for a coach's tampering. Frank Cusumano said that he is sure that occurred, before Collins announced his portal decision.

Remember the "Jerry Maguire" line - "Show me the money!" It rings so true!

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What is weird, big NIL (name,image, likeness) money is being thrown around (apparently) but I have yet to see one college level athlete's likeness, endorsement, advertisement or the like yet.  What the heck are they doing to earn this money given what NIL means? Seems like nothing but bribes to go to the "college" of choice of big money bag fans.

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7 minutes ago, WVBilliken said:

What is weird, big NIL (name,image, likeness) money is being thrown around (apparently) but I have yet to see one college level athlete's likeness, endorsement, advertisement or the like yet.  What the heck are they doing to for this money given what NIL means? Seems like nothing but bribes to go to the "college" of choice of big money bag fans.

I’m sure the big schools will say it’s for the athletes’ help in running summer camps, outreach programs, etc.

But, you’re right. It’s actually just legalized bribing.

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2 hours ago, davidnark said:

Court cases have held that players have a legal right to monetize their image and likeness. This isn't an NCAA decision. 

Exactly.  You can't regulate how much a player makes in NIL money.  You can regulate transfers though. Start with that. If a coach leaves, they get a waiver and don't have to sit a year.  Easiest fix in sports.

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I see no way it’s going back to how it was before NIL.  It seems that either SLU starts the money flowing, accepts a role as a place where kids who weren’t good enough for the power 5 to grab some attention in a year or two of playing and move up, or SLU drops down to Division 3 and joins Wash U in the UAA  (otherwise known as the “egghead eight”). 
 

One other possibility is that the NCAA just gives everyone eligibility regardless of whether or not they accept money for playing, as long as they are academically eligible. If someone decides to play pro ball for a few years and gets no traction in that career choice, why not give them a scholarship? They may see the value of a college degree at that point. It’s really no different than if someone went to work or joined the military for a few years, then went back to school.

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7 minutes ago, Lord Elrond said:

I see no way it’s going back to how it was before NIL.  It seems that either SLU starts the money flowing, accepts a role as a place where kids who weren’t good enough for the power 5 to grab some attention in a year or two of playing and move up, or SLU drops down to Division 3 and joins Wash U in the UAA  (otherwise known as the “egghead eight”). 
 

One other possibility is that the NCAA just gives everyone eligibility regardless of whether or not they accept money for playing, as long as they are academically eligible. If someone decides to play pro ball for a few years and gets no traction in that career choice, why not give them a scholarship? They may see the value of a college degree at that point. It’s really no different than if someone went to work or joined the military for a few years, then went back to school.

This is right. If you get paid from the Boston Celtics or the Athens Gyro's you are't eligible to play NCAA basketball. Howver if you're paid by Joe's Car lot to play for the University of KY you are. It's a sham. 

This thread assumes the money in college basketball wants it fixed. They don't. 

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23 minutes ago, SShoe said:

Exactly.  You can't regulate how much a player makes in NIL money.  You can regulate transfers though. Start with that. If a coach leaves, they get a waiver and don't have to sit a year.  Easiest fix in sports.

You are absolutely right.  The immediate eligibility rule is under the control of the NCAA and following your suggestion would likely eliminate the "buy a player issue."  For example, do any of us with a brain really think Collins would be transferring if he had to lose a year of eligibility (and substantially less NIL $$$, if he got any at all) and do any of us really think TENN would be paying him any significant amount of NIL $$$ if he could only play 1 year after sitting out the 2022-23 season?

Unfortunately the decision makers at the NCAA are totally under the control of the major schools, which drove the immediate eligibility bus.  The NCAA is afraid that the major conferences would withdraw from the organization.

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I think that the major conferences withdrawing from the NCAA is exactly where this is heading. They form their own organization, form their own rules, and get their own tv contracts. I’m sure one of the rules will be that if anyone wants to leave one of the remaining NCAA schools and head on over, go ahead and come in. And while we’re at it, what’s with4 years? Most people who graduate from college outside of sports take over 4 years to get their degree, so why not more years of eligibility to play sports, as long as they are academically eligible?

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13 minutes ago, bauman said:

You are absolutely right.  The immediate eligibility rule is under the control of the NCAA and following your suggestion would likely eliminate the "buy a player issue."  For example, do any of us with a brain really think Collins would be transferring if he had to lose a year of eligibility (and substantially less NIL $$$, if he got any at all) and do any of us really think TENN would be paying him any significant amount of NIL $$$ if he could only play 1 year after sitting out the 2022-23 season?

Unfortunately the decision makers at the NCAA are totally under the control of the major schools, which drove the immediate eligibility bus.  The NCAA is afraid that the major conferences would withdraw from the organization.

I'm not so sure that your last paragraph doesn't happen once the major conferences finish with the consolidation that is driven by the major football conferences. For the major conferences College Football is the key to their entire athletic programs.

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1 hour ago, billiken_roy said:

first i dont think the courts intended the NIL to just be a money giveaway....

second, the ncaa can do whatever they want in regards to their tourney.   so if a program doesnt want to abide by the requirement to pay a penalty to the schools that lost said player in an amount equal to the pay that player receives, then either that school needs to refuse a roster spot to the player to remain eligible for the tourney or they would be out of the tourney.   

Players can make money off their NIL just like every other person in the US.  It is not the US Government's business how that money is made as long as it's done legally and taxes are paid. 

As for the second paragraph, it is unenforceable.  Schools are not involved in NIL, a student is as a private person with another private entity.  The amount doesn't require disclosure and therefore wouldn't be known to penalize a school.

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The truth behind all of this is that there are far too many colleges and places of higher education, and all of them are competing against each other for a dwindling pool of student applications, and for all other sources of available money whether it is from the government, donors, tuition, sports, or research. Those that make it (the money) will move forward, those that do not will disappear. Schools will not be involved directly with NIL because to them NIL is a drain of money which they do not desire to participate in.

The interesting situation, which I think is about to happen, comes when the non school NIL organizations start competing with the schools for the same big donors attention. This will not be an easy problem to deal with. I assume that as players start receiving more money from the  NILs the schools may start withdrawing their all inclusive scholarships. And yes, I think it is possible that schools whose star players transfer to other schools, will start suing one another to recover the expenses they incurred training the player during the prior years. It all comes down to money. Some schools will wind up at the top, others will go down.

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21 minutes ago, TheA_Bomb said:

Players can make money off their NIL just like every other person in the US.  It is not the US Government's business how that money is made as long as it's done legally and taxes are paid. 

This. 

The root of NIL is that college athletes have value involved in their name and position as athletes, and as such are able to monetize that value. Apply this to a normal college student and no one has a problem with it. If an accounting major has good grades and gets a paid internship with a Big 4 accounting firm, they’re using their position as an accounting student to make money off that. If a nursing student happens to have cultivated a large following on Instagram or TikTok and parlays that into sponsorship money or maybe some modeling gig, it’s the same deal. If a SLU student decides that they can make more money or better prepare for the future by transferring to a school in a larger city with similar scholarship money, who’s going to have a problem with that? Effectively, the only difference is that we watch college sports for fun, and nobody in their right mind is watching somebody take an organic chemistry mid-term for their entertainment. Should that be the reason why athletes should be limited in what they can do? I don’t think so.

I think some regulation could be beneficial to root out sham sponsorships, but I think that this is the new normal and you have to either adjust or get passed by.

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1 hour ago, Lord Elrond said:

I see no way it’s going back to how it was before NIL.  It seems that either SLU starts the money flowing, accepts a role as a place where kids who weren’t good enough for the power 5 to grab some attention in a year or two of playing and move up, or SLU drops down to Division 3 and joins Wash U in the UAA  (otherwise known as the “egghead eight”). 
 

One other possibility is that the NCAA just gives everyone eligibility regardless of whether or not they accept money for playing, as long as they are academically eligible. If someone decides to play pro ball for a few years and gets no traction in that career choice, why not give them a scholarship? They may see the value of a college degree at that point. It’s really no different than if someone went to work or joined the military for a few years, then went back to school.

that's an interesting take.   i gotta think about this one.  could be an equalizer.   like you said, all at once the player sees the value of the degree after basketball more or less taken away as a permanent future.   hmmmmmm

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1 hour ago, TheA_Bomb said:

Players can make money off their NIL just like every other person in the US.  It is not the US Government's business how that money is made as long as it's done legally and taxes are paid. 

As for the second paragraph, it is unenforceable.  Schools are not involved in NIL, a student is as a private person with another private entity.  The amount doesn't require disclosure and therefore wouldn't be known to penalize a school.

you dont have to give me your tax returns, pay stubs or w-2's either if you apply for a mortgage with me, but i can sure deny you a loan for not giving it to me.   

same here, if you dont want to tell me what the kid got to come to your school fine, you cant play in my ncaa tourney as long as that kid is on your roster either.   

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