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I love the new rule changes. The 2 that I really like are coaches are no longer able to call live ball timeouts. Coaches should not be allowed to bail out his team if they are in trouble. I wish they would't allow players to call timeout if they are laying on the floor. The other I like is the 10 second clock doesn't reset after a timeout. That 1 made no sense at all. I am not convinced a 30 second shot clock hurts us. That's 5 less seconds we have to play strong defense

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-from ncaa.com.....

NCAA.com
Last Updated - Jun 8, 2015 17:16 EDT

The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel on Monday approved a package of proposals and areas of focus for officials in men’s basketball to improve the pace of play, better balance offense with defense and reduce the physicality in the sport.

The NCAA Men’s Basketball Committee made similar recommendations before the 2013-14 season, and it felt the changes improved the game. But after gaining some positive traction, the balance between offense and defense again tilted toward the defense last season. Scoring in Division I men’s basketball dipped to 67.6 points a game last season, which neared historic lows for the sport.

The key areas officials will focus on in the upcoming season are:
• Perimeter defense, particularly on the dribbler and strictly enforcing directives established before the 2013-14 season.
• Physicality in post play.
• Screening, particularly moving screens and requiring the screener to be stationary.
• Block/charge plays.
• Allowing greater freedom of movement for players without the ball.

Pace of play

With an eye on reducing inaction, the panel approved several proposals to improve the pace of play. The most significant is reducing the shot clock to 30 seconds. The shot clock was last reduced for the 1993-94 season when it went from 45 seconds to 35.

Teams will also have one fewer team timeout (only three can carry over instead of four) in the second half. Officials will focus more on resuming play quickly after a timeout and will issue a delay-of-game warning when a team does not comply and a one-shot technical foul on subsequent violations.

The rest of the package designed to improve the pace of play includes:
• Adjusting the media timeout procedures to allow a timeout called within 30 seconds of a break (at the 16:30 mark) or at any time after the scheduled media timeout becomes the media timeout.
• Removing the ability for a coach to call timeout when the ball is live.
• Allowing a total of only 10 seconds to advance the ball to the front court (with a few exceptions).
• Reducing the amount of time allotted to replace a disqualified player from 20 to 15 seconds.

Restricted-area arc

The panel also approved the expansion of the restricted-area arc from 3 feet to 4 feet. This arc would be effective in 2015-16 for Division I and 2016-17 for Divisions II and III. Moving the arc a foot farther from the basket is part of a continued focus on reducing the number of collisions at the basket.

Games in the 2015 Postseason NIT were played with the 4-foot arc on an experimental basis.

When compared to the 2013 NIT, which had the same block/charge standards as the 2015 event (aside from the 4-foot arc), the number of block/charge plays decreased from 2.77 per game to 1.96 per game.

Faking fouls

During the use of a video review to see if a possible flagrant foul occurred, the panel approved a rule that would allow officials to penalize players who fake fouls. The NCAA Men’s Basketball Rules Committee felt that players trying to draw fouls by deception is a growing issue.

Other changes

Other proposals approved by the panel include:
• Allowing officials to use the monitor to review a potential shot clock violation on made field goals throughout the entire game.
• Making Class B technical fouls (hanging on the rim and delaying the resumption of play, for example) one-shot technical fouls. Previously, two shots were granted for these types of technical fouls.
• Eliminating the five-second closely guarded rule while dribbling the ball.
• Removing the prohibition on dunking in pregame warmups and at halftime.

Experimental rule

The panel also approved an experimental rule to allow players six personal fouls, instead of five, in the 2016 postseason tournaments other than the Division I Men’s Basketball Championship.

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-my take...

-The NCAA Men’s Basketball Committee made similar recommendations before the 2013-14 season, and it felt the changes improved the game. But after gaining some positive traction, the balance between offense and defense again tilted toward the defense last season -- okay, have the refs call the fouls that are in the book

-Removing the ability for a coach to call timeout when the ball is live. --- interesting, I can see some egos getting very damaged

-Allowing a total of only 10 seconds to advance the ball to the front court (with a few exceptions) -- I kind of like this one, but wish they showed the exceptions

-Reducing the amount of time allotted to replace a disqualified player from 20 to 15 seconds. -- I thought it was 30 seconds, woops

-Faking fouls - I would like to see more emphasis on this, but would settle for refs calling the fouls that are committed

-Eliminating the five-second closely guarded rule while dribbling the ball. -- I hate this

-Removing the prohibition on dunking in pregame warmups and at halftime - this is a cure all, I just hope no baskets need to be replaced because some hoss is hanging on the rim during warmups as that would really mess up the plan to speed up the amount of time a game takes

-the 5 second closely guarded is my biggest beef, why penalize defense? also, I can see a forward getting a pass outside the lane and him and his defender banging the crap out of each other for 15 seconds while progress to the basket is being made

-I am anxious to see how the refs call all these changes as there is a lot for them to digest and adjudicate

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I love the new rule changes. The 2 that I really like are coaches are no longer able to call live ball timeouts. Coaches should not be allowed to bail out his team if they are in trouble. I wish they would't allow players to call timeout if they are laying on the floor. The other I like is the 10 second clock doesn't reset after a timeout. That 1 made no sense at all. I am not convinced a 30 second shot clock hurts us. That's 5 less seconds we have to play strong defense

I agree with this. For a weak defensive team, this is a killer because the pace of the game picks up and there are a lot more scoring opportunities. For a strong defensive team, the opponent has less time to find a good shot and hence is would think that would lead to more forced/poor shots. Now, if our defense does not return to its historical norm...well, it could be ugly.

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I love the pace of play changes. The timeout tweaks might not look like much, but having worked the game and shot clock at college games before, those will make a huge difference. Coaches do everything they can to give themselves as much timeout time as possible.

The faking fouls rule is great, too. FIFA could take note - once they clean up the rest of thier mess, of course.

The no-dunking-in-warmups rule is gone! Finally! There was no reason for this to still be in place. None.

Man, I love these changes overall. The only thing I'm not sold on - and I know it's just experimental - is granting 6 fouls instead of 5. Like I said in an earlier thread, the NBA has 6 fouls for a 48 minute game and college is 5 for 40; a foul for every 8 minutes of clock is about right.

Anyway, it's nice to see the NCAA doing something good for once.

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I love the pace of play changes. The timeout tweaks might not look like much, but having worked the game and shot clock at college games before, those will make a huge difference. Coaches do everything they can to give themselves as much timeout time as possible.

I am sure this will be screwed up many, many times across basketball this year. The timeout numbers will get screwed up. It also makes it less appealing for TV/radio games and harder for the gameday staff to schedule promo stuff.

But from a basketball standpoint, it is common sense. I hated the timeout followed immedaitely by another timeout. No more gaming the subs to get a guy about 4 minutes of rest via 1 timeout.

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What's considered a live ball timeout? If a team makes a basket in the first half and the clock is still running, can you call a timeout before you inbound it?

I would guess that's a yes because the ball isn't live at that point.

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The only rule change I don't like is shortening the shot clock. because I think there will be a ton of forced shots, unwise shots and it favors guys who just will fire up shots just because they have the ball in their hands. I always appreciated Majerus' offense in which you continue to motion, screen, pass and work for the best shot, not just a good one. As bad as shooting percentages were this year, I think they will be even worse next year. The only rule change that should really help the offense is keeping the defenders from being so physical. Hopefully players' offensive skills will really come front and center now because they won't have to worry about being mugged every time they step into the lane.

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I would think no. If the clock is running I would think that is a live ball and a coach could not call a timeout.

Yeah, except think that one through. If a coach can never call a timeout when the clock is running, when can he? Only at stoppage of play due to an infraction, foul or o/b?

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Yeah, except think that one through. If a coach can never call a timeout when the clock is running, when can he? Only at stoppage of play due to an infraction, foul or o/b?

Right. You have described the new rule. Players can still call timeouts but frankly they may be harder to see or hear than coaches.

I will say that "losing 2" timeouts in the first half may not result in fewer timeouts being called. It is possible that the number of times a coach decides to use a timeout in the 1st half because they have 2 to burn when they would have otherwise saved it will go up and in games that are not close (coach has plenty left at the end) the extra first half timeouts will be more than 2nd half timeouts prevented. That said, it will likely cause less timeouts in more games.

The faking fouls rule is great, too. FIFA could take note - once they clean up the rest of thier mess, of course.

I should let this go but while knowledge of soccer rules is going up I am always bewildered at the myths that persist. Simulation has ALWAYS been illegal in soccer under the "Unsporting Behaviour" provision (you could "yellow" or even "red" card a diver 50 years ago if you wanted too). It has been a point of emphasis in many leagues at various times and some leagues (EPL, MLS, and probably more) have created explicit simulation yellow card rules (it really is just a PR move for fans as it was already illegal). It is specifically been added to FIFA's laws as well (Law 12 specifically as a caution but it can be a yellow any time under "unsporting behaviour") and has been a point of emphasis at the last two world cups. Specific rules have been created in MLS and EPL that allow for simulation fines and suspension after video review for things missed in game (this is probably true of many more leagues).

I think there are representation fallacies that convince U.S. fans in particular that diving is much more common that it is (I watch a lot of soccer and while I do see some, it is definitely less than once a game probably even less than once every 2 games). I also think some people have trouble with soccer's "conditional"/"intrepretive" formal rule structure as it is different than the strong rule codes of baseball and football (although "intent" probably plays a role in all sports rules to some extent).

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Yeah, except think that one through. If a coach can never call a timeout when the clock is running, when can he? Only at stoppage of play due to an infraction, foul or o/b?

I would think that is right. He can always tell a player to call time,which was the way it was for years. Whats it been 20 -30 years that coaches were allowed to call any timeouts.

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Specific rules have been created in MLS and EPL that allow for simulation fines and suspension after video review for things missed in game (this is probably true of many more leagues).

Is this enforced? Because it seemed like refs missed a lot of 'simulation' in the World Cup games I watched last year.

If I'm wrong, I'm wrong. I just see guys taking liberties and playing the next game, with no word of fines.

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In the World Cup I remember that Costa Rican guy getting fined in qualifying against U. S for getting Besler a yellow. There have been fines in World Cups (Rivaldo back in the day). Last year there was no fine for Robben but that was basically because of a technicality--that is, the referee saw the incident and that cannot be overruled in FIFA cases (MLS and EPL are different in this regard so there's that). They are certainly less common in World Cup matches than the fines the MLS levies (I know some fans complain now about too many fines against faking/diving) but that makes sense in that the World Cup is a tournament and not a league.

My issue is that people remember Robben's dive (egregious as it was) and not the several dozen games with no dives. It is also possible that with higher stakes comes more incentives to dive.

“Video evidence can be used for serious breaches of the principle of fair play such as brawling, spitting at opponents, verbal insults and racist slurs, or for incorrectly awarded red or yellow cards. In cases such as these we must make use of the avenues already open to us and intervene after the event if necessary. In this context, we should include the faking of injury, intentional diving or time-wasting in our considerations.”

-Honesty's Friend Sepp Blatter

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In the World Cup I remember that Costa Rican guy getting fined in qualifying against U. S for getting Besler a yellow. There have been fines in World Cups (Rivaldo back in the day). Last year there was no fine for Robben but that was basically because of a technicality--that is, the referee saw the incident and that cannot be overruled in FIFA cases (MLS and EPL are different in this regard so there's that). They are certainly less common in World Cup matches than the fines the MLS levies (I know some fans complain now about too many fines against faking/diving) but that makes sense in that the World Cup is a tournament and not a league.

My issue is that people remember Robben's dive (egregious as it was) and not the several dozen games with no dives. It is also possible that with higher stakes comes more incentives to dive.

“Video evidence can be used for serious breaches of the principle of fair play such as brawling, spitting at opponents, verbal insults and racist slurs, or for incorrectly awarded red or yellow cards. In cases such as these we must make use of the avenues already open to us and intervene after the event if necessary. In this context, we should include the faking of injury, intentional diving or time-wasting in our considerations.”

-Honesty's Friend Sepp Blatter

I don't watch "a lot" of soccer, but I have caught a game at least every other week this season and have seen four or five Women's World Cup games. Blatant dives, pretty rare. But it does appear that any contact, even fairly minor, precipitates ground contact, and a good number of players have been taught/coached/whatever always to execute at least one roll when they do make contact with the ground.

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I don't watch "a lot" of soccer, but I have caught a game at least every other week this season and have seen four or five Women's World Cup games. Blatant dives, pretty rare. But it does appear that any contact, even fairly minor, precipitates ground contact, and a good number of players have been taught/coached/whatever always to execute at least one roll when they do make contact with the ground.

-it is like bball players who seem to be trying to break their own neck to try to get a foul with whatever that move is called, Blake Ahearn is probably teaching his Clayton High kids that move as I type this as he did it a lot

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I don't watch "a lot" of soccer, but I have caught a game at least every other week this season and have seen four or five Women's World Cup games. Blatant dives, pretty rare. But it does appear that any contact, even fairly minor, precipitates ground contact, and a good number of players have been taught/coached/whatever always to execute at least one roll when they do make contact with the ground.

There is undoubtedly some of what you speak of in some games but it is hardly the problem that casual observers constantly moan about. I have watched parts of all the Women's World Cup and I have seen no notable diving at all (actually, I cannot remember any but I do not suffer the representation fallacies of the diving sensitive). The artificial turf has certainly made the games less physical.

The point was and still is that the NCAA was praised for adding a rule against simulation and soccer was singled out for its unregulated diving (when soccer has always had rules against). I see more simulation in the average Billiken (basketball) game than I do in soccer so this struck me as odd. I remember how generally beloved Cody Ellis's simulation talents were and even Jolly's efforts at simulation are seen favorably. Also, I pointed out that the rules against simulation have long been part of the game and a specific point of emphasis for nearly all leagues as well as FIFA. Anti-Simulation is not that easy to enforce live (and unfortunately is often something much easier to see from a different angle and in slow-mo) and as a consequence soccer has used video evidence to further enforce what it can. I think the NCAA rule is fine but it will undoubtedly be unevenly enforced.

As an aside to the going to ground, soccer has a continuous clock and strict substitution rules--going to ground can get you a short rest.

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-back to bball... I would love to see us spring some full court pressure on teams to get 10 second counts but I guess we should prepare for pressure ourselves and have in-bounds plays before we attack our own press

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Anti-Simulation is not that easy to enforce live (and unfortunately is often something much easier to see from a different angle and in slow-mo) and as a consequence soccer has used video evidence to further enforce what it can. I think the NCAA rule is fine but it will undoubtedly be unevenly enforced.

What's all this I hear about anti-stimulation rules? These are testosterone-raged young men and athletes to boot. If you enforce anti-stimulation rules, you're liable have more than one unfortunate incident.

It's what? Oh. Never mind.

emily-litella.jpeg

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What's all this I hear about anti-stimulation rules? These are testosterone-raged young men and athletes to boot. If you enforce anti-stimulation rules, you're liable have more than one unfortunate incident.

It's what? Oh. Never mind.

emily-litella.jpeg

I immediately thought I had made another typo! I am so ... relieved.

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Two changes I would love to see:

1. A rule against calling a time out when a player is in the air and about to land out of bounds. Should be you can't get a timeout unless you have a pivot foot on the court or are lying on the ground in bounds.

2. I hate the blocked shot tie up. A blocked shot is not a tie up. Let the play continue and see what happens. It seems like this is only used when the ref anticipates a foul, blows his whistle, realizes after blowing the whistle that there was no foul but only a clean block, and then falls back on the blocked shot tie up. Get rid of this. When someone blocks a shot and then the ball is loose in the middle of the lane, that's great action. Let's quit blowing a whistle in the middle of that action.

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2. I hate the blocked shot tie up. A blocked shot is not a tie up. Let the play continue and see what happens. It seems like this is only used when the ref anticipates a foul, blows his whistle, realizes after blowing the whistle that there was no foul but only a clean block, and then falls back on the blocked shot tie up. Get rid of this. When someone blocks a shot and then the ball is loose in the middle of the lane, that's great action. Let's quit blowing a whistle in the middle of that action.

What's the alternative, then? If a player goes up with the ball and the defender blocks it cleanly, with both of them having hands on the ball for any period of time, and the player on offense comes back down with the ball - if this isn't a block, then it's traveling. Right?

Your scenario assumes that the ball becomes loose after both players have a hand on it for more than an instant. Usually, though, the opposing forces cause the offensive player to come back down with it before he loses it.

A 'tie up' - or jump ball - is the most logical call here. It's a 50-50 play in that neither player should be punished for it. The ball wasn't blocked cleanly away, and no one committed a foul. So a 50-50 outcome is just, in addition to being a way to avoid a traveling call.

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