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Cheese were you not a high school administrator? My question is how does a Jontay  Porter just skip his senior year and reclassify. I'm not taking any shots but I doubt he's Sheldon Cooper. I know he was home schooled but how do you get enough credits. He's been on the AAU circuit so I doubt he's been in summer school. Legit question. 

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I haven't been in hs since 97 but I could have easily graduated in 3 years if I chose to. I'm no genius either. I just took a heavy course load with tons of ap classes. My senior year consisted of 2 office aid periods, 1 blow off class, a gym and trig which I needed and had failed. I was out of school by 1230 every day and went to flo valley in the afternoon to start college level credits.

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Reclassifying is incredibly common. In the Big Ten, Race Thompson is reclassifying from 18 to 17 at Indiana only to redshirt this coming season. Musa Jallow is doing the same at O$U but will play next year. Eric Ayala is a top 100 kid who still hasn't decided if he's going to college in fall of 17 or 18. That's just off the top of my head I'm sure there's plenty of reclass kids in other conferences too I think kids that are good athletes and decent students focus on getting credits early and often so they can have recruiting flexibility. Common in hockey too. Football has "spring enrollees" that graduate high school a semester early.

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Each state has their own graduation requirements.  Often districts might offer tiered diplomas and so you can get a diploma that meets the minimum standard or one that would be of college prep quality.  Some districts even provide an attendance certificate for those who are not capable of meeting the minimum standards such as a student with a significant disability - now that would not meet the NCAA requirements.  Home schooled kids fall under a completely different metric.  First, to attend college you do not have to technically have graduated from  high school - if you perform exceptionally on the ACT or SAT - like a score in the 99% for example the college could care less if you actually have a diploma now that alone would not meet the NCAA requirement.  States have a wide range of home school rules as it applies to whether the person can get a diploma or not.  In Missouri for example, each district can set whatever standards they want for these kids.  It was not uncommon for student to show up for their senior year and their parents want them to attend school for the year and then get a diploma.  A district could let this happen or not depending on what they wanted to do or not do.  It was not uncommon for a district to have proficiency exams to grant credit earned for these students - for example, if you passed the calculus class then it could be assumed that you also could easily pass the test for algebra so you could get all the math credit that way.  The same could be said for if you passed the second year foreign language class that you would be given credit for year 1.  Band could be handled by having the student play pieces that would demonstrate his/her musical proficiency - I think you get the idea.  Reclassifying while you have attended high school would not be that hard as pointed out by Torch but reclassifying as a home school student to meet the NCAA requirements may not be so easy - not saying it is not doable.  The issue really is where did the student get home schooled and how would the NCAA view the credit earned situation - I am now out of my element.  One last thing - when the district would put together their course offerings/curriculum description booklets they would send it to the NCAA for review and anything that did not pass muster would then be updated to do so.  This was seldom a problem except if you changed the description of a class - often after a new curriculum was adopted - and it did not have the key words in it.  The NCAA simply had people or now I would guess software that look for the key words and if they are in it then no problem but if they are missing you may have to appeal to the NCAA and get an education expert on their payroll to review the matter.  Once we changed our biology curriculum to meet the new National Science Teachers recommendations and the NCAA kicked it out.  It took most of the year to get the matter resolved but once we got to their experts they could easily see that we actually made the class more rigorous and the course was then accepted.  Hope this helps.

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16 minutes ago, cheeseman said:

Each state has their own graduation requirements.  Often districts might offer tiered diplomas and so you can get a diploma that meets the minimum standard or one that would be of college prep quality.  Some districts even provide an attendance certificate for those who are not capable of meeting the minimum standards such as a student with a significant disability - now that would not meet the NCAA requirements.  Home schooled kids fall under a completely different metric.  First, to attend college you do not have to technically have graduated from  high school - if you perform exceptionally on the ACT or SAT - like a score in the 99% for example the college could care less if you actually have a diploma now that alone would not meet the NCAA requirement.  States have a wide range of home school rules as it applies to whether the person can get a diploma or not.  In Missouri for example, each district can set whatever standards they want for these kids.  It was not uncommon for student to show up for their senior year and their parents want them to attend school for the year and then get a diploma.  A district could let this happen or not depending on what they wanted to do or not do.  It was not uncommon for a district to have proficiency exams to grant credit earned for these students - for example, if you passed the calculus class then it could be assumed that you also could easily pass the test for algebra so you could get all the math credit that way.  The same could be said for if you passed the second year foreign language class that you would be given credit for year 1.  Band could be handled by having the student play pieces that would demonstrate his/her musical proficiency - I think you get the idea.  Reclassifying while you have attended high school would not be that hard as pointed out by Torch but reclassifying as a home school student to meet the NCAA requirements may not be so easy - not saying it is not doable.  The issue really is where did the student get home schooled and how would the NCAA view the credit earned situation - I am now out of my element.  One last thing - when the district would put together their course offerings/curriculum description booklets they would send it to the NCAA for review and anything that did not pass muster would then be updated to do so.  This was seldom a problem except if you changed the description of a class - often after a new curriculum was adopted - and it did not have the key words in it.  The NCAA simply had people or now I would guess software that look for the key words and if they are in it then no problem but if they are missing you may have to appeal to the NCAA and get an education expert on their payroll to review the matter.  Once we changed our biology curriculum to meet the new National Science Teachers recommendations and the NCAA kicked it out.  It took most of the year to get the matter resolved but once we got to their experts they could easily see that we actually made the class more rigorous and the course was then accepted.  Hope this helps.

Thanks 

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